Snoring nostril no limits

Newswise – BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Snoring, the nocturnal disease that afflicts myriad marriages, affects nearly 40 percent of adult men and 24 percent of adult women. In addition to affecting others trying to sleep, snoring can be a symptom of a more serious sleep disorder like obstructive sleep apnea.

Snoring is the result of tissue vibration as air flows through the coils and constrictions that make up the human airway. It does this during sleep due to the relaxation of the muscles that support the airways.

“Think of the waking state like a balloon fully inflated,” said Kirk P. Withrow, associate professor at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. When a person falls asleep more deeply, it is as if the air is escaping from the balloon, causing the sides to come closer and closer together. ”

Once that breakdown reaches a certain point – one that is different for everyone – it gets loud.

Withrow, an ENT doctor with the UAB, says the only animals besides the bulldog who suffer from this habit are humans.

“Can you stop please?”

Because everyone has different circumstances, Withrow says the causes of snoring can be difficult to determine and often require evaluation by a knowledgeable doctor.

“Most of the time, snoring comes from structures in the upper part of the throat, including the uvula, soft palate, and tonsils,” he said. “Less often the tongue and epiglottis can be to blame.”

While the nose is generally not the direct source of tissue vibration, nasal congestion – like a stuffy nose from a cold or allergy – can play a role in snoring. This contributes to snoring mainly due to the change in the position of the structures in the throat when breathing through the mouth, namely the displacement of the tissue in the direction of the back wall of the throat.

“Relieving nasal congestion and moving from mouth breathing can improve or eliminate snoring,” Withrow said. “Such treatment may include allergy management or surgery to correct structural defects in the nose.”

Withrow adds that gravity makes snoring usually worse when sleeping on your back. Various devices and techniques aimed at keeping a person off the back can be beneficial in this situation.

“In some cases it can be as easy as sewing a tennis ball into a shirt pocket and wearing it upside down to sleep,” he said.

Alcohol and other sedating medications lead to increased muscle relaxation during sleep and consequently to increased snoring.

“The importance of body in relation to snoring cannot be emphasized enough,” said Withrow. “Cadaver studies have shown that fat deposits in the tongue and the side walls of the throat correlate directly with total body . Therefore, loss is often an important part of treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. “

Other

Withrow says that if the problem is pure snoring with no apnea episodes – breathing breaks – there is some evidence that snoring may contribute to more serious problems like atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries.

“This is more likely if the snorer has other problems like obesity, cholesterol, or tobacco abuse,” he said. “Studies have linked primary snoring to an increased incidence of daytime sleepiness and mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. Snoring has been shown to be associated with decreased sexual satisfaction in older men, a problem that worsens as the volume of snoring increases. ”

UAB Medicine’s Center for Sleep-Wake Disorders provides advanced testing, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disorders in a relaxed, informal environment designed specifically for patient comfort and well-being. To find out more, visit the center’s official website.

About UAB

Known for its innovative and interdisciplinary approach to education at both graduate and bachelor level, the University of Alabama at Birmingham is an internationally renowned research university and academic medical center as well as Alabama’s largest employer with around 23,000 employees and an annual economic impact of over $ 7 billion in the state. The five pillars of UAB’s mission include education, research, patient care, community service and economic development. UAB is a two-time recipient of the prestigious Center for Translational Science Award. Find out more at www.uab.edu. UAB: Driven by will.

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