Sleep disorders typically happen in neurological ailments, however typically go undetected

March 19, 2021

Read for 2 minutes

Source / information

Source:

Healio interviews

Disclosure:
Malhotra does not report any financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> Subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

March includes several events dedicated to sleep health and wellbeing. That week was Sleep Awareness Week, remembered by the National Sleep Foundation in the 7 days after daylight saving time began. March 19th is World Sleep Day.

World Sleep Day is an awareness-raising event hosted by the World Sleep Society that emerged from sleep medicine practitioners who gathered “to discuss and distribute sleep information around the world,” according to their website.

Raman Malhotra, MD, President-elect of the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Associate Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine, spoke with Healio Neurology about the incidence of sleep in patients with neurological .

Healio-Neurology: Can you discuss the two-way relationship between sleep and neurological ?

Malhotra: The control and mechanisms for the sleep process come from the brain, so any neurological disorder, such as a stroke, tumor, or neurodegenerative disease, can involve and damage parts of the brain that control sleep and alertness. For this reason, patients with neurological disorders often report drowsiness, fatigue, insomnia, and sleep disorders to their neurologist. In addition, it has been shown that sleep disorders, regardless of the cause, the risk of many neurological diseases, such as stroke or neurodegenerative diseases, or cause them to occur earlier. It is this interesting two-way relationship that makes it even more important for patients and their caregivers to better understand these relationships.

Healio-Neurology: Are some sleep disorders more common than others in people with neurological disorders?

Malhotra: Various sleep disorders are more commonly seen with certain neurological disorders. REM sleep behavior disorders or acting out dreams are more commonly seen in people with Parkinson’s disease or other synucleinopathies. REM sleep behavior disorder can sometimes be the first symptom of Parkinson’s disease older than [by] other symptoms of the disease in many cases by more than 10 . Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people who have had a stroke. Sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or hypoventilation are more common in people with neuromuscular disorders that affect the respiratory muscles or the muscles of the upper respiratory tract, such as myasthenia gravis or motor neuron disease. Narcolepsy was seen more frequently in patients with myotonic dystrophy. Patients with MS are at risk for a variety of sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, and insomnia. Patients who have suffered a traumatic brain injury are at greater risk of sleep apnea and narcolepsy.

Healio-Neurology: Has there been any recent development or research regarding the treatment or management of sleep disorders in these patients?

Malhotra: There is ongoing research promoting waking up to combat severe excessive daytime sleepiness that is linked to various neurological disorders such as MS and TBI. Many of the same drugs that we use to treat drowsiness in narcolepsy are being studied in a variety of neurological disorders to test their effectiveness and safety in these populations. Another exciting study that has begun examines the role of sleep apnea treatment in stroke recovery and as secondary stroke prevention. There is growing evidence that sleep can play a critical role in recovery from mild TBI and concussion.

Healio-Neurology: What unmet needs remain for these patients?

Malhotra: Unfortunately, most sleep disorders in patients go undiagnosed and diagnosed. It is important to emphasize to both patients and their caregivers that sleep is essential to health and can aid in recovery from neurological disorders. It’s also important to check for common sleep disorders such as insomnia and sleep apnea, as leaving these disorders untreated can increase the risk of developing neurological disorders like dementia, other neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke.

Relation:

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> Subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *